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Lycanthrope



Joined: 25 Sep 2009
Posts: 4
Location: Canada
Country: Canada

PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 10:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

In Japanese, is there an expression that is similar to "sacrifice the flesh to crush the bone"? Can anyone write out the phonetic version of the Japenese version in english if possible?

Does "douskoi" mean anything or is it only an exclamation?
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alexgamerz



Joined: 06 Oct 2009
Posts: 61
Location: Canada
Country: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 5:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

i have read that some people watch doramas without subtitles so they can better listen to what the people are saying and learn that way. I have extremely limited vocabulary (only a few words really). could i try and learn this way? would it work? and are there any specific shows that would be good to learn from this way. thanks in advance
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Anime Dad



Joined: 19 Jun 2006
Posts: 11356
Location: オーストラリア
Country: Australia

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 6:04 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

alexgamerz wrote:
i have read that some people watch doramas without subtitles so they can better listen to what the people are saying and learn that way. I have extremely limited vocabulary (only a few words really). could i try and learn this way? would it work? and are there any specific shows that would be good to learn from this way. thanks in advance


I would be very surprised if you learned anything at all that way. There's no easy way to learn Japanese, but the best way would be with proper lessons, preferably with a native or fluent speaker.
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a-nesuto



Joined: 19 Oct 2005
Posts: 3918
Location: Normandy SR2
Country: Canada

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 7:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

alexgamerz wrote:
i have read that some people watch doramas without subtitles so they can better listen to what the people are saying and learn that way. I have extremely limited vocabulary (only a few words really). could i try and learn this way? would it work? and are there any specific shows that would be good to learn from this way. thanks in advance


its helped me but i find japanese variety show are much better to learn japanese this way.
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gaijinmark



Joined: 13 Apr 2007
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Location: The real world, no alternative facts
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PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 8:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

a-nesuto wrote:


its helped me but i find japanese variety show are much better to learn japanese this way.
    The cool thing about variety shows is that they usually have subtitles in kanji/hiragana/katakana so it helps your reading skills as well. (At least is has for me.)
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Bedi



Joined: 01 May 2003
Posts: 223
Location: 東京

PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 6:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

alexgamerz wrote:
i have read that some people watch doramas without subtitles so they can better listen to what the people are saying and learn that way. I have extremely limited vocabulary (only a few words really). could i try and learn this way? would it work? and are there any specific shows that would be good to learn from this way. thanks in advance


in your case i would rather watch the tv series with (soft) subtitles first, and repeadetly listen to some parts you think will be useful without the subtitles later on.

You will probably learn more useful japanese from dramas than variety shows, since people in variety shows often exaggerate in their speech or use funny/silly expressions. so for the beginning learning a little simple but clean japanese is recomended. otherwise you will mess up nuance wise in several real life situations later on. also, many subtitles of variety shows probably dont include notes on whether what the speaker said isnt in fact considered rude, but was used to make people laugh or whatsoever.

this became a quite unorganized comment, sorry Smile
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Vallkryst



Joined: 12 Oct 2009
Posts: 8


PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 2:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

alexgamerz wrote:
i have read that some people watch doramas without subtitles so they can better listen to what the people are saying and learn that way. I have extremely limited vocabulary (only a few words really). could i try and learn this way? would it work? and are there any specific shows that would be good to learn from this way. thanks in advance


I'd learn some basic japanese grammar and vocabulary first before watching dramas without subs. Without a decent grasp of the basics you'll never get further than making out a few words. Japanese grammar is not too complicated, if you're willing to devote some time to it it shouldn't be a problem. Reading and writing however .... Bang Head
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Itazura ichiban



Joined: 25 Mar 2004
Posts: 916
Location: SF Bay Area
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 24, 2009 2:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Vallkryst wrote:
Reading and writing however .... Bang Head


De aru ka!
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maryanne



Joined: 13 Nov 2007
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Location: Switzerland
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 5:51 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Hello!

A friend and I are wondering how you have to answer a "-masenka" question, if you want to accept the offer. Is it "hai" or "iie"?
We aren't sure about 'cause it's a negative-formend question ...

The example was this one:
A [is taking a walk with B]: "uchi ni kaerimasenka."
B: "hai, kaerimashou." or "iie, kaerimashou."

Thanks in advance,
maryanne.
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yebisu



Joined: 03 Oct 2009
Posts: 295
Location: OC
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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 6:10 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

you say hai Smile
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hitomi #1



Joined: 14 Feb 2009
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Location: Syracuse, NY
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 3:24 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

gaijinmark wrote:
    The cool thing about variety shows is that they usually have subtitles in kanji/hiragana/katakana so it helps your reading skills as well. (At least is has for me.)

Same here, music shows are the same way with the subs, I still have too far to go though, Shameful Cry but animes are also very good, they're more geared for a younger audience so they use much more simpler words and phrases, helped me learning many of them. Applaud
Course having both subs helps even more.

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KAZdoramma



Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 4313
Location: Nagoya
Country: Japan

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

hitomi #1 wrote:

Same here, music shows are the same way with the subs, I still have too far to go though, Shameful Cry but animes are also very good, they're more geared for a younger audience so they use much more simpler words and phrases, helped me learning many of them. Applaud
Course having both subs helps even more.


It puts more emphasis on wot their trynna say. It makes watching variety shows funnier in my view. Mabye thats just me,,,just a japanese point of view Sweat
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desert-raven



Joined: 23 Jun 2009
Posts: 248
Location: Naperville
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:12 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

KAZdoramma wrote:


It puts more emphasis on wot their trynna say. It makes watching variety shows funnier in my view. Mabye thats just me,,,just a japanese point of view Sweat


I've seen this many times, maybe you know, what are they trying to say when they use katakana for Japanese words? It seems strange so there must be some cultural meaning to doing it.

Or sometimes they will say a Japanese word, but the subtitile will be written with English letters.

I'm so confused...

-Dave
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gaijinmark



Joined: 13 Apr 2007
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Location: The real world, no alternative facts
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:36 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

desert-raven wrote:


I've seen this many times, maybe you know, what are they trying to say when they use katakana for Japanese words? It seems strange so there must be some cultural meaning to doing it.

Or sometimes they will say a Japanese word, but the subtitile will be written with English letters.

I'm so confused...

-Dave


Usually it's for emphasis. If they say "つごい" (tsugoi) it's great. But if the subtitle says "ツゴイ" in katkana, then it's REALLY great!!
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KAZdoramma



Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 4313
Location: Nagoya
Country: Japan

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

gaijinmark wrote:


Usually it's for emphasis. If they say "つごい" (tsugoi) it's great. But if the subtitle says "ツゴイ" in katkana, then it's REALLY great!!


ummm yeah the general jist of wot ur trynna say is correct. Putting more emphasis on wot people say on the show gives more flow to the conversations and stuff,. Victory! Peace!

and gaijinmark, i think u meant すごい??
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gaijinmark



Joined: 13 Apr 2007
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Location: The real world, no alternative facts
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PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 10:58 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

KAZdoramma wrote:

and gaijinmark, i think u meant すごい??


Yeah, you're right, gomen Bow It's still early Friday morning here. Beaten

I miss kokuou Puppy Dog Eyes


Last edited by gaijinmark on Sat Dec 19, 2009 12:20 am; edited 1 time in total
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KAZdoramma



Joined: 04 Oct 2009
Posts: 4313
Location: Nagoya
Country: Japan

PostPosted: Fri Dec 18, 2009 11:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

gaijinmark wrote:


Yeah, you're right, gomen Bow It's still early Friday morning here. Beaten


no prbs, didnt mean to be too picky Sweat Victory! Peace! Bonk
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hitomi #1



Joined: 14 Feb 2009
Posts: 6884
Location: Syracuse, NY
Country: Liechtenstein

PostPosted: Sat Dec 19, 2009 4:01 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

KAZdoramma wrote:


It puts more emphasis on wot their trynna say. It makes watching variety shows funnier in my view. Mabye thats just me,,,just a japanese point of view Sweat

I always thought too because there are so many ways to pronunce things, putting the Kanji lets you what word they are saying. Doh! Have watched dramas when someone said their name, then people ask what Kanji they used to spell it. hehe No, it's not just you, seems more interesting putting the dialouge with it and if you don't mind constantly pausing the video, both subs really are good.(if they're translated right)

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Sengo



Joined: 29 Aug 2009
Posts: 450
Location: United States
Country: United States

PostPosted: Tue Mar 16, 2010 3:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Hi all,

Very recently, my cousin's husband's mother in Japan passed away. I met her husband but not the mother.

I need to send condolences to my cousin and her husband but don't know what or (or course) how to say it.

If there're native speakers out there, can you please provide me with the appropriate/polite wording, please? I can speak some Japanese but these types of situations are unknown territory for me.

Really appreciate the help! Onegai shimasu.
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Bedi



Joined: 01 May 2003
Posts: 223
Location: 東京

PostPosted: Wed Mar 17, 2010 1:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote Back to top

Sengo wrote:
Hi all,

Very recently, my cousin's husband's mother in Japan passed away. I met her husband but not the mother.

I need to send condolences to my cousin and her husband but don't know what or (or course) how to say it.

If there're native speakers out there, can you please provide me with the appropriate/polite wording, please? I can speak some Japanese but these types of situations are unknown territory for me.

Really appreciate the help! Onegai shimasu.



心よりお悔やみ申し上げます [kokoro yori okuyami moushiagemasu] (Meaning: Me deepest condolences).

If you just want to say, "My condolences," then perhaps ご愁傷様です (goshuushou sama desu)
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